The Seychelles

Seychelles Islands

Which Island you should choose before travelling to the Seychelles

Seychelles

Choosing between 115 Islands…

Don’t sweat the decision too much. Be it one of the three main islands are Praslin, La Digue or Mahé – its mountainous interior being home to Morne Seychellois National Park – or any outlying island, you’ll strike gold.

Seychelles 115 islands fall into two distinct groups, the granitic Inner Islands that lie within the relatively shallow Seychelles plateau, 4° south of the equator, and the low-lying coralline Outer Islands that lie beyond the plateau up to 10° south of the equator.

Seychelles

Seychelles

The Outer Islands are themselves further divided into five groups, extending in a gleaming arc towards the east coast of Africa: the Amirantes group lying 230km distant from Mahé; the Southern Coral Group; Alphonse Group; Farquhar Group and finally the Aldabra Group, some 1150km from Mahé.  There are 43 Inner Islands – 41 granitic islands and 2 coralline islands.  All 72 Outer Islands are coralline.

Mahé

When it comes to wishing for the archetypal idyllic island, it’s impossible to think past the glorious bays caressed by gorgeously multihued waters of Mahé. To the northeast, a range of granite peaks, including Mahé’s highest point, Morne Seychellois (905m), adds to this vivid panorama. By far the largest and most developed of the Seychelles islands

La Digue

La Digue. Remember that tropical paradise that appears in countless adverts and glossy travel brochures? Here it’s the real thing, with jade-green waters, lovely bays studded with heart-palpitating gorgeous beaches, and green hills cloaked with tangled jungle and tall trees. Anse Source d’Argent on the west coast, with its picture-perfect, sea-smoothed glacis rocks. As if that wasn’t enough, La Digue is ideally situated as a springboard to surrounding islands, including Félicité, Grande Sœur and the fairy-tale Île Cocos.

Praslin

A wicked seductress, Praslin has lots of temptations: stylish lodgings, high-quality restaurants serving the freshest of fish, tangled velvet jungle, curving hills dropping down to gin-clear seas, gorgeous stretches of silky sand edged with palm trees and a slow-motion ambience. No, you’re not dreaming! Lying about 45km northeast of Mahé, the second-largest island in the Seychelles

With such a dreamlike setting, the Seychelles is, unsurprisingly, a choice place for a honeymoon. But there’s much more to do than simply cracking open a bottle of champagne with the loved one in a luxurious hotel. Having earned a reputation as a paradigm of ecotourism, the Seychelles is a top spot to watch birds and giant tortoises in their natural habitat. And a vast living world lies just below the turquoise waters, beckoning divers of all levels. When you tire of beaches you can venture inland on jungle trails, indulge in fine dining or enjoy the sublime laid-back tempo.

Seychelles island

Seychelles island

And time has come to spread the word: yes, this paradise is accessible to us all. On top of ultra-luxurious options, the Seychelles Islands has plenty of quaint, affordable self-catering facilities and guesthouses, often situated on some of the best land. Though it remains an expensive destination, its tourist authorities are now targeting non-millionaires, promoting these economy options. But fear not: mass tourism it will never be.

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Seychelles Things to do

Seychelles Islands

Seychelles beaches Anse source D'argent

Visit the unbelievable Seychelles beaches. Many of the beaches are untouched by man’s influence and are refreshingly uncrowded. They offer clear blue skies and a tranquility you will rarely find. A hike along the coastline from Beau Vallon to Anse Major will take about 1.5-2 hours and your reward will be a small deserted beach that’s fit for a king. The scenery along the hike is breath-taking. Not all beaches are suitable for swimming depending on the time of year, due to the seasonal winds. Do not ignore warning signs indicating that a beach is hazardous for swimming, no matter how appealing the waters may look.

Vallee de Mai Seychelles

vallee de mai seychelles

Vallee de Mai Seychelles is a national park and world heritage site, home to amazing flora and fauna, including the world’s largest seed: the coco de mer. Entrance fee is require.

Aldabra Atoll Seychelles

Aldabra Atoll Seychelles

Aldabra Atoll: The world’s largest coral atoll that stretches about 22 miles east to west and encloses a huge tidal lagoon. Aldabra is the original home of the giant land tortoise and tiger sharks and manta rays can also often be seen here.

Water sports Seychelles

Watersport Seychelles

water sport seychelles

The warm Indian Ocean waters make Seychelles the perfect place for the water enthusiasts. Explore on the board of a yacht, power boat, catamaran or sailboat. Windsurfing is also popular and the best time for this activity is usually around May and October, at the start and end of the trade winds.

Scuba diving, snorkeling, and fishing are also extremely popular and can be done almost anywhere in the Seychelles. Baie Ternay is superb and easily accessible by glass bottom boat tour from Beau Vallon beach – leave yourself an empty day and walk the beach for a ‘last minute’ booking – great deals can be bartered. Snorkeling (provided you have your own gear – some Seychelles hotels lend masks, snorkels and fins to guests) is FREE and there are many great spots: off some of the small beaches at Glacis, past Mouse Island at Anse Royale, along the reef at Port Launay (near Ephelia Resort). Often spotted are a wide array of tropical fish, sea turtles, eagle rays and more!

Land Sports: Golf, tennis, squash, badminton, horseback riding, biking and hiking are some of the recreational activities available on the Seychelles Islands. Bike rentals and walking tours are great ways to sightsee and since distances are relatively short and the scenery is beautiful, walking is probably the best way to see the smaller islands (La Digue, Praslin), while walking along the main road can be quite intimidating as the roads are narrow and local cars/busses drive quite quickly. On Mahe it is not advised to ride bicycles, and there are no rental shops within sight. Bird watching is also popular and the islands are home to many of the worlds most treasured and rare species of animals. The best place to do so is Cousin Island which although only 1 km (0.6 miles) in diameter, is home to more than 300,000 birds, but many unique species can be found at ease on Mahe.

Seychelles Travel

Seychelles Islands

seychelles

Seychelles’ 115 islands fall into two distinct groups, the granitic Inner Islands that lie within the relatively shallow Seychelles plateau, 4° south of the equator, and the low-lying coralline Outer Islands that lie beyond the plateau up to 10° south of the equator.

The Outer Islands are themselves further divided into five groups, extending in a gleaming arc towards the east coast of Africa: the Amirantes group lying 230km distant from Mahé; the Southern Coral Group; Alphonse Group; Farquhar Group and finally the Aldabra Group, some 1150km from Mahé.  There are 43 Inner Islands – 41 granitic and 2 coralline.  All 72 Outer Islands are coralline.

Aldabra Group
Aldabra Atoll
Assumption
Astove
Cosmoledo Atoll

Amirantes Group
African Banks
D’Arros
Desroches
Poivre Atoll
Remire
St. Joseph Atoll

Southern Coral Group
Coëtivy
Platte

seychelles

The Inner Islands which are mostly granitic, cluster mainly around the principal islands of Mahé, Praslin and La Digue, forming the cultural and economic hub of the Seychelles, as well as the centre of its tourism industry.Together they are home to the majority of Seychelles’ accommodation facilities as well almost the entire population of the archipelago.  There are 43 Inner islands in total – 41 granitic and 2 coralline.

Main Islands
Mahé
Praslin
La Digue

Others
Bird Island
Cerf
Chauve Souris
Cousine
Denis Island
Frégate
North Island
Round Island (Praslin)
Silhouette
Ste. Anne

Seychelles Weather

Swimming with whale sharks in Seychelles

Seychelles Travel Guide

Whale sharks Seychelles

Everybody knows you go to Seychelles Islands to swim with whale sharks. Well at least everybody who loves the ocean loves diving and has the complete box set of Jacques Cousteau.

Situated eight kilometers northwest of Mahe, Shark Bank is considered to be the best diving spot in the Seychelles. A granite plateau interweaved with massive granite boulders set the scene with never ending amazement of a rich marine life. The underwater ballet of the whales’ shark teeming with a large variety of tropical reef fish will make you think about Jules vernes novels Twenty Thousand leagues under the sea.

Whale sharks Seychelles

Whale sharks Seychelles

The waters surrounding Mahe are crystal clear, along the Indian Ocean but the reward is an island paradise where your biggest worry of the day is whether to walk to the end of the island for bird watching, hang out in a hammock or cruise out with your buddies for a day of whale watching. Lucky for you, it is easy enough to fit all of these into a couple of days on the island.

A day with whale sharks is unlike anything you will have ever experienced. A couple of thousand of these big boys come to feed off the plankton-rich seas. Once you are in the water, face to face with a 15-ton, 15m-long giant, the rest of the world seems to fade away. Their grace, colorful spots and unworldly bulk take you back to the time of dinosaurs and leviathans.

Whale sharks Seychelles

And while such close interaction with wildlife is definitely a delicate topic, local tour operators have teamed up with the World Wildlife Fund to create some best practices for the tours. Visitors are required to wear a life jacket or wetsuit, you cannot feed the fish or submerge yourself beneath them, only three people (plus a guide) are allowed in the water at one time, and, no, you cannot catch a ride on their fin.

On your way back to the island, ask your guide if you can stop for a snorkel. If you are lucky, you may spot a manta ray soaring through the depths of the clear water.